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4.2 Obstacles to Observing Bions

Experimentation is an important part of the scientific method. Because bions are particles, one might expect to observe bions directly with some kind of instrument. However, observing an intelligent particle with an instrument made of common particles is difficult in practice. This is because an intelligent particle is selective about how it interacts with common particles.[27] For example, if an intelligent particle chooses to ignore an instrument such as an accelerator, then that accelerator will not detect that particle.[28]

Being partly composed of intelligent particles, it is possible for a man to be his own instrument to observe bions. However, because of the fragility of the physical body and its overriding needs, most people cannot directly observe bions without some kind of assistance, such as by meditation.


footnotes

[27] Of course, the computing-element program decides all particle interactions—either directly in the case of common particles, or indirectly thru learned programs in the case of intelligent particles—and all particles are blocks of information manipulated by the computing elements that run the computing-element program. However, as a literary convenience, intelligent particles will sometimes be spoken of as having their own volition. This avoids excessive repetition of the details of the computing-element reality model.

[28] In computational terms, ignoring other particles and not interacting with them is always easiest, because interaction requires computation, whereas noninteraction requires nothing in terms of computation. Thus, for example, bions passing thru a wall is computationally easier for those bions than being repelled by that wall. And bions remaining invisible to ordinary sight is computationally easier for those bions than reflecting and/or absorbing and/or emitting light, and being seen.


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